CODE NAME: CONDOR

Knowing the truth about the Kennedy Assassination is understanding America today.

Moderators: kenmurray, dankbaar, Bob, Dealey Joe

CODE NAME: CONDOR

Postby Dealey Joe » Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:22 am

“Later in 1971, the ubiquitous Ted Shackley, fresh from Vietnam, came into the picture. In his new job as director of the CIA’S Western Hemisphere Division, Shackley had to pick up the pieces after the failed coup. Shackley’s work in OPERATION MONGOOSE made him the perfect choice for Richard Nixon’s plans for Chile. Thanks to Henry Hecksher, the soil in Chile had already been plowed, and Shackley had easy ground to till. The newly arrived Santiago Station Chief, Ray Warren, less action-directed and more politically oriented than Hecksher, kept up the CIA’S contacts with the Chilean military.


Meanwhile, elsewhere in the world, there were major changes in East-West relations. In 1970, Allende had received a great deal of support from Moscow. Now, according to Pepsi’s Donald Kendall, in return for de’tente – and especially for the promise of a Strategic Arms Limitations Treaty – Nixon and Kissinger had gotten the Kremlin’s permission to deal with Allende as they wished. Korry learned that the Russians refused Allende’s plea in late 1971 for more than half a billion dollars to bail out the country’s economy. Kendall called the Soviet abandonment of the first freely elected Marxist president ‘the first fruits of de’tente.’ The Chinese, who were also in negotiations with Kissinger (the famous Nixon – Kissinger visit to China would take place in February 1972), also refused Allende any cash for his fractured economy.


Korry assumed, wrongly, that the CIA, like him, was reporting back to Washington on the points of vulnerability in Allende’s presidency and on the opposition plans. He was also wrong in assuming that no CIA plotting was underway. Ted Shackley, the heir to Robert Kennedy’s policy in Latin America, began methodically to replace the CIA assets lost in Chile and the rest of Latin America when Allende’s forces learned all their names. To do this, he turned to the Cuban nationalists he had recruited for OPERATION MONGOOSE and then used again in Laos. He readied these men for a new effort to overthrow the Chilean government.


On October 15, 1971, President Nixon pulled Korry out of Chile and replaced him with career diplomat Nathaniel Davis. Charles Meyer cabled Korry, suggesting that he go back to Africa as an ambassador until things in Chile ‘quieted down’: Nixon wanted no one to learn what he was attempting – let alone planning – for Chile. Korry refused the Africa posting.


After Senator Altamirano blocked Allende’s buyout negotiations with Korry, he and his allies on the far left pressured Allende into expropriating ITT’S mines as well as those of the big copper companies, all without compensation. The expropriation insurance written by the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) forbade American companies from interfering in the domestic politics of other countries, and the CIA concealed from OPIC the truth about the political activities of ITT and the other companies.
In fact, the Nixon White House pressured OPIC into paying the insurance claims, which eventually cost U.S. taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars, just as Korry had feared. He refused to accept this outcome quietly and made himself extremely unpopular by alerting the Justice Department and seeking court actions by the United States government.


Meanwhile, the Allende regime’s move against the multinational corporations, combined with the large number of foreign Communists operating in Chile, caused the CIA to gather its resources to back his removal. Although by the summer of 1973 Chile’s economy was collapsing under Allende’s failed Marxist measures, Shackley did not wait for Chileans to resolve matters on their own. His Western Hemisphere Division orchestrated yet another coup attempt.


Though Shackley left his post before the coup unfolded, it was his team that set it in motion. This time, the man the CIA backed to take over the government was General Augusto Pinochet Uguarte, Allende’s friend and fellow Freemason, who had just replaced General Prats as Army chief of staff. Allende was so fooled by the coup that he told supporters on the morning of his overthrow that he believed Pinochet, his Masonic brother, would be his savior of his Popular Unity government. When he learned the truth, Salvador Allende, remaining in the Moneda even as it burned, shot himself in the head.
Pinochet established a military dictatorship that engaged in every form of torture. The CIA helped train Pinochet’s secret police, the dreaded DINA, and the CIA suggested that DINA hire some of Shackley’s Cubans for its murderous operations. In 1976, DINA sent Michael Vernon Townley, an American who had been deeply involved in CIA-sponsored activity during the 1970 efforts against Allende, to the United States on a recruiting mission. Two of the Cubans whom Townley recruited were Dionesio Suarez and Vergilio Pablo Paz, both of whom were affiliated with Omega 7, the anti-Castro terrorist group. In addition, Suarez had once tried to fire a mortar shell into the United Nations building in New York City.


Paz became a hit man for an ongoing operation supervised by the head of DINA, Colonel Jose’ Contreas Sepulveda. Code named CONDOR, this was the plan to kill vocal foes of the Chilean junta living in exile. CONDOR also provided an assassination capability for several other governments, including the Bureau of State Security in South Africa.


The assassinations began in October 1974 with General Carlos Prats, General Schneider’s deputy and later chief of staff, and his wife, Cora, as the first victims. They were killed in a car bombing in Buenos Aires, where they were living in exile. In March, 1975, Pinochet’s henchman ordered the hit team to kill Defense Minister Oscar Bonilla, who had recently fallen out with Pinochet. Bonilla died along with five other people when the helicopter in which they were passengers blew up. On October 6, 1975, Paz himself fired shots at former Christian Democratic leader Bernardo Leighton. Fortunately, the couple survived the shooting. Shackley and his colleagues had created a Frankenstein monster.


In the midst of these murders in 1975, Colonel Contreas journeyed to Washington and was welcomed by Deputy CIA Director Vernon Walters in a series of secret meetings at CIA headquarters. While in the United States, Contreas traveled to Miami and met with Cuban exile leaders.


The murders later came home to the United States. In Washington, D.C., on September 21, 1976, Virgilio Paz and Dionisio Suarez, directed by Michael Vernon Townley, planted a bomb in the car of Allende’s former ambassador to the United States, Orlando Letlier. Letlier had settled in Washington and was working with the far-left Institute for Policy Studies. He was driving two American colleagues to work. Ronnie Karpen Moffit sat next to him in the front seat, and Moffit’s husband, Michael, in the back seat. As the car approached Sheraton Circle along Washington’s Embassy Row, Michael Moffit later recalled, there was a hissing sound, and a moment later the bomb went off.
Lettlier’s lower body was severed – the blast turned him completely around in his seat. Ronni Moffit showed no outward signs of injury, but her carotid artery had been severed, and she drowned in her own blood. For the second decade in a row, the CIA’S use of murder, this time through a surrogate intelligence service, had come home to the United States. Innocent Americans were paying for the CIA’S actions in Chile.


What role Richard Helms may have played in the DINA assassination spree has long been debated. Unwelcome publicity over the 1970 Chile venture, combined with his failure to cooperate with the Nixon White House about Watergate, brought his carefully cultivated CIA career to an end before DINA came into being. Helms was fired as director of Central Intelligence in November 1972, and packed off to Tehran as ambassador to the Peacock throne. By the time of the Letlier murder, he was supposedly long out of the CIA – although the station chief in Tehran repeatedly complained that Helms seemed to be running his own intelligence operations out of the embassy.”


The Secret History Of the C.I.A., by Joseph J. Trento. Copyright 2001 by Joseph J. Trento, pages 392 – 395.
If you ask the wrong questions the answer does not matter!
then if you control the questions being asked the answer still does not matter!
To continue doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result is "Insane"
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Dealey Joe
 
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CODE NAME: CONDOR

Postby Bruce Patrick Brychek » Sun Sep 16, 2012 10:34 pm

09.16.2012

Dear JFK Murder Solved Forum Members and Readers:

Mr. Joe Hall - Powerful, precise, and revealing. I have been aware of this for decades.

Ignoring a study of this material is like failing to analyze the ice-berg that the Titanic
hit.

Any additional analyses, interviews, investigation, readings, research, studies, thoughts,
or writings on any aspect of this subject matter ?

Comments ?

Respectfully,
BB.
Bruce Patrick Brychek
 
Posts: 2142
Joined: Sat May 26, 2007 9:09 am

CODE NAME: CONDOR

Postby Bruce Patrick Brychek » Mon Feb 13, 2017 7:42 pm

02.13.2017:

Dear JFK Murder Solved Forum Members and Readers:

01.19.2012 - Mr. Joe Hall, an Excellent JFKMS Forum Moderator, Member, Researcher, and Writer Posted this
Very Important Headline. It never received the attention, development, discussion, focus, research, study,
and writing that it deserved.

I will try to connect a few dots below. Some of my Previous and Renewed Recent Posts better explain and
update some aspects of this Subject Matter, and provide a better Overview.

First, this has no relationship to the movie: THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR, starring Robert Redford as a CIA
analyst and reader. But it is a movie that was ahead of its time then, and presented some subtle twists.

After America dropped the Atomic Bombs in Japan on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki World War II came
to a believed and perceived Screeching Halt, as many, I think wrongly, believed both then and now.

Over 60 % of All American War Supplies were shipped to 2 locations in 1945:

1. South Korea, and

2. Viet Nam.

Not only did most American's not know this then, they still don't know this today.

And not only did most American's not know that the American Plans for Korea, Viet Nam, Laos, Cambodia, and
other surrounding areas had been Drafted and Outlined by 1945, most American's don't know this today in 2017.

The Drafts and Outlines for South America began shortly thereafter.

By 1954 American's had engaged in their First Battles in Viet Nam after the North Vietnamese finished slaughtering
the French. Mel Gibson's movie based upon the excellent books, WE WERE SOLDIER'S, excellently captures some of
the sense of what was at least going on at the Ground Level Back then.

CODE NAME: CONDOR, OPERATION CONDOR, and several other names touch on the Original U.S. Game Plans for South
America.

Behind the scenes were Allen Welsh Dulles, John Foster Dulles, James Jesus Angleton, Richard Case Nagell, Robert
Vernon Townley, Theodore "The Blond Ghost - Ted" Shackley, David Atlee Phillips, Frank Sturgis, a/k/a Frank Fiorini,
E. Howard Hunt, Richard Helms, and the Entire Supporting Cast.

This is also what helped lead to the only U.S. Supported Bombing and Murder of Orlando Letelier in Washington, D.C.

Allende, Pinochet, Chile, and Venezuela were major parts of the Master Plan.

Augusto Jose' Ramon Pinochet Ugarte, (11.25.1915 - 12.10.2006), ruled Chile from 1973 - 1998 as the Chilean General,
Politician, Military Ruler, and Commander-In-Chief of the Chilean Army. Pinochet assumed power in Chile following the
U.S. Backed Coup d'etat on 09.11.1973. (MANY TODAY STILL SEE SIGNIFICANCE IN THAT DATE. BB.)

The U.S. Controlled, Directed, Funded, Guided, Managed Coup d'etat overthrew the Democratically Elected Socialist
Unidad Popular Government of President Salvador Allende, AND ENDED ALL CIVILIAN RULE AND DEMOCRACY.

AN OFTEN MISSED POINT BY MANY AMERICAN RESEARCHER's INVESTIGATING THE FALL OUT OF THE WATERGATE SCANDAL
IS THAT THE WATERGATE INVESTIGATION ALSO ANALYZED, REVIEWED, AND TOUCHED ON THE U.S. SPONSORED COUP
D'ETAT IN CHILE, BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER THAT EVENT, AND THE TRANSITION PERIOD.

SOME OF THIS MATERIAL IS BURIED UNDER THE BLANKET OF NATIONAL SECURITY.

Today VENEZUELAN COMMUNISTS OWN, CONTROL, AND OPERATE CITGO AND ALL THE OIL AND REFINERIES THAT SELL
GASOLINE IN THE U.S.TODAY.

NOT HOW THE U.S. MASTER PLAN FORESAW THINGS FOR TODAY.

Today, and going forward, you must understand that Revised U.S. Master Plans for Mexico and South America are at
stake NOW, TODAY.

REGARDLESS OF WHAT YOU MAY THINK AND READ IN THE MAIN STREAM MEDIA OF PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP TODAY,
HIS IMMIGRATION PLANS, AND THE MEXICO WALL, YOU MUST UNDERSTAND THAT WHAT WE HEAR, READ, AND SEE IS
NOT EVEN THE TIP OF THE ICEBERG.

As always, I recommend that you completely read, research, and study material on your own, then formulate your
own Opinions and Thoughts.

Any additional analyses, interviews, investigations, readings, research, studies, thoughts, or writings on any aspect
of this Subject Matter ?

Bear in mind that we are trying to attract and educate a Whole New Generation of JFK Researcher's who may not be
as well versed as you.

Comments ?

Respectfully,
BB.
Bruce Patrick Brychek
 
Posts: 2142
Joined: Sat May 26, 2007 9:09 am

Re: CODE NAME: CONDOR

Postby kenmurray » Tue Feb 14, 2017 3:11 pm

Hugo Turner: Ted Shackley, A life in the CIA:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATJYVEYB6k0
kenmurray
 
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CODE NAME: CONDOR

Postby Bruce Patrick Brychek » Sun Apr 14, 2019 3:58 am

04.13. 2019
Saturday
10:58 p.m., Chicago, Illinois time:

Dear JFK Murder Solved Forum Members and Readers:

01.19.2012 - Mr. Joe "Dealey Joe" Hall, an excellent JFK Murder Solved Forum Contributor and Researcher,
originally Posted this Very Important Headline.

Mr. Ken Murray and myself followed-up with additional material.

1992 - James Earl Sutton - Files in CONFESSIONS OF AN ASSASSIN stated that killing JFK was NO BIG PROJECT.

The CIA had done far worse in South America, Venezuela, Argentina, and else where in the World.

This week President Donald J. Trump has turned over massive amounts of American Classified and Top Secret
Files on South America.

Why now ?

Why not other Subject Matters ?

As always, I strongly recommend that you first read, research, and study material completely yourself
about a Subject Matter, and then formulate your own Opinions and Theories.

Any additional analyses, interviews, investigations, readings, research, studies, thoughts, or writings
on any aspect of this Subject Matter ?

Bear in mind that we are trying to attract and educate a Whole New Generation of JFK Researchers
who may not be as well versed as you.

Comments ?

Respectfully,
BB.


30+ YEARS OF FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACTION
Declassification Diplomacy: Trump Administration Turns Over Massive Collection of Intelligence Records on Human Rights and Argentina

Published: Apr 12, 2019
Briefing Book #669
Edited by Carlos Osorio and Peter Kornbluh
For more information, contact:
202-994-7000 or nsarchiv@gwu.edu
47,000 Pages of CIA, FBI, NSC, DOD and State Dept. Records Touted as “Largest” Government-to-Government Transfer of Declassified Documentation
Documents Spotlight Buenos Aires Base for International Death Squad Operations sponsored by Condor States; Record Ruthless Repression by Argentine Security Forces during Military Dictatorship, 1976-1983
National Security Archive Commends Completion of U.S. Government’s Special Argentina Project as ‘Model of Declassification Diplomacy’ and Major Contribution to the Cause of Human Rights and History
TIMELINE:


March 24, 1976:  A military coup deposes Isabel Perón as President of Argentina and instates the most brutal dictatorship either Argentina or Latin America has ever seen. At least 22,000 people are killed or disappeared during the first three years after the coup alone. The dictatorship lasts until 1983.




August 16, 2000:  Secretary of State Madeleine Albright tells the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, a group that works to locate grandchildren stolen during the dictatorship, to first look for relevant documents at the National Security Archive. Albright also announces at a press conference that the State Department will “do its best” to produce documents on the “Dirty War” in Argentina, but that it is not the only agency with records on the dictatorship.


July 16, 2002: The National Security Archive, working with the Center for Legal and Social Studies in Buenos Aires, files a FOIA request with the State Department for thousands of records on the dictatorship that have already been reviewed but remain withheld. The Archive demands the department release the documents immediately or face litigation.


August 22, 2002: The State Department releases 4,700 records. The documents are a treasure trove of information that help clarify human rights violations committed by the dictatorship. The State Department release leaves out policy decisions but do reveal a remarkable level of knowledge by the US government about the abuses. Intelligence and military agencies do not join the declassification process.




2003-2004: The National Security Archive publishes former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger’s June 10, 1976 memo telling the Generals on the dirty war "if There Are Things that Have to Be Done, You Should Do Them Quickly."


2008 – 2015: Working with the Center for Legal and Social Studies Center in Buenos Aires and two consecutive Argentine ambassadors, the National Security Archive develops a voluminous set of terms, keywords, guidelines to use when requesting declassification of U.S. intelligence, security and military records regarding human rights violations during the dictatorship.

2008 – 2017: The National Security Archive’s Southern Cone project director Carlos Osorio introduces documentary evidence and testimony in five key trials on Argentina.



December 2008:  Osorio presents evidence and testimony in the Guerrieri - Amelong [Operacion Mexico] trial in Rosario, Argentina



December 2011:  Osorio presents evidence and testimony in the Automotores Orletti Trial in Buenos Aires, Argentina



September 2014: : Osorio presents evidence and testimony in the Ceramics Workers [Campo de Mayo] trial via teleconference to San Martin, Buenos Aires, Argentina 




March 23, 2015:  The Argentine Embassy awards Carlos Osorio, the Archive’s Southern Cone project director, a special award praising his "contribution in the fight for human rights during the Argentine civic-military dictatorship."



May 2015:  Osorio presents evidence and testimony in the Operation Condor trial in Buenos Aires, Argentina




March 18, 2016: The Obama administration, in preparing to visit Buenos Aires around the time of the approaching 40th anniversary of the coup, announces that it will review and declassify new U.S. intelligence, security and military records to show “U.S. support for the pursuit of human rights and justice in Argentina.”


March 23, 2016: The National Security Council access staff asks the National Security Archive for help identifying search terms and keywords to aid in the declassification.

April 9, 2016: The National Security Archive provides the NSC with 100 pages of: chronologies outlining key human rights violations and counterinsurgency operations; names of perpetrators and military units; US intelligence, military and security archival series and types of documents; keywords and terms, and the names of 344 disappeared mothers whose children are suspected to be appropriated by security forces in Argentina.



May 2016: Osorio presents evidence and testimony in a trial in Rome, Italy, on Operation Condor which victimized dozens of Italian Argentine citizens.



May 27, 2016 Operation Condor Verdict (Argentina trial) – Guilty



August 8, 2016: The Office of the Director of National Intelligence releases the first tranche of documents resulting from President Obama’s directive. The release consists of 1,078 pages, primarily from the Carter Presidential Library.




December 12, 2016: The Office of the Director of National Intelligence releases the second tranche of documents resulting from President Obama’s directive. The release consists of approximately 550 pages of documents from the Carter, Ford, Reagan, and Bush presidential libraries.




January 7, 2017: Operation Condor Verdict: Condemned to Life



April 27, 2017: The Trump administration releases 931 State Department records and gives them to Argentine President Mauricio Macri during his Washington trip. The release includes a re-review of 857 documents previously withheld in part or in full from a release carried out by the Department of State in 2002, and 119 high-level documents selected for inclusion from two chapters of a forthcoming Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS)volume on South America, 1977‒1980.


2016-2018: To support the NSC searches, the National Security Archive provides 1,200 highly redacted Federal Bureau of Investigation records and 900 highly redacted Defense Intelligence Agency records, for re-review. The Archive also provides 3,000 largely unredacted DIA and CIA records on Chile as a standard to follow for the upcoming Argentine declassification.
The Archive keeps a regular channel of communication and consultancy with the NSC team.
 
Washington D.C., April 12, 2019 – In late May 1976, the secret police chieftains of six Southern Cone military regimes gathered at a clandestine summit in Santiago, Chile, to create a “new unit, which was given the code name ‘Teseo’”—a reference to Theseus, the mythical Greek King of the Athenians and heroic slayer of the Minotaur, among other enemies. The mission of “Teseo” was to “conduct physical attacks against subversive targets” abroad, particularly militant Latin American leftists in Europe, according to formerly secret CIA intelligence reports turned over today to Argentina by the U.S. government, and posted for the first time by the nongovernmental National Security Archive.
The "Teseo" program represented a new initiative under "Operation Condor"—the clandestine collaboration of Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil to strike at their opposition in the Southern Cone and beyond.  At the time, the CIA also managed to obtain the “text of the agreement by Condor countries regulating their operations against subversive targets”—a comprehensive planning paper on financing, staffing, logistics, training, and selection of targets that reveals both the banal and dramatic details of organizing and implementing Condor’s “Teseo” death squad operations. The “Teseo” operations base would be located “at Condor 1 (Argentina).”  Each member country was expected to donate $10,000 to offset operational costs; and dues of $200 would be paid “prior to the 30th of each month” for maintenance expenses of the operations center. Expenses for agents on assassination missions abroad were estimated at $3,500 per person for ten days, “with an additional $1000 first time out for clothing allowance.”
Individuals to be eliminated, the Condor agreement stated, would be proposed by member services with “final selection…by vote and on the basis of a simple majority.” As a chilling section titled “Execution of the Target” explained: “This is the responsibility of the operational team which will (A) intercept the target, (B) Carry out the Operation, and (C) Escape. With the exception of the team leaders,” the planning paper stated, “the members of the intelligence and operational teams should not know each other for security and functional reasons.”
 
THE UNITED STATES DECLASSIFICATION PROJECT FOR ARGENTINA
The revealing CIA “intelligence information cables” on Operation Condor are part of a major collection of records released on April 12 at a government event in Washington D.C., "Declassification Diplomacy: The United States Declassification Project for Argentina." During the diplomatic ceremony, hosted by U.S. Archivist David Ferriero at the National Archives, U.S. officials completed the turnover of some 7500 CIA, FBI, DOD, NSC and State Department records—47,000 pages in total—to Argentina’s Minister of Justice and Human Rights, German Garavano. Garavano graciously thanked the Trump administration for fulfilling a formal request for the records by the Argentine government, made on the fortieth anniversary of the military coup during a state visit to Argentina by then-President Barack Obama.

Official Invitation to Ceremony on Transfer of Declassified Documents to Argentina
 
“I believe we have a responsibility to confront the past with honesty and transparency,” Obama stated at Remembrance Park in Buenos Aires on March 24, 2016, paying tribute to the tens of thousands of human rights victims of Argentina’s ‘dirty war” while pledging to release U.S. intelligence files on atrocities committed during the military dictatorship.
Before Obama left office, his administration released the first two tranches of Argentina records, drawn from documents on file at the Presidential libraries. During a summit meeting with Argentine President Mauricio Macri in April 2017, President Trump personally handed him a diskette containing another tranche of records. But, three years after Obama’s initial authorization, the most sensitive and revealing intelligence documents are only now being released, marking the completion of the Declassification Project for Argentina.

President Trump personally handed President Mauricio Macri a diskette containing a third tranche of records
 
In his closing remarks at today’s ceremony, National Security Archive analyst Carlos Osorio, who served as an advisor to the Argentina Declassification Project, commended the U.S. government for pursuing what he called “one of the most comprehensive discretionary declassifications of sensitive intelligence records in recent history.”  “The Argentina Project represents a new model of declassification diplomacy, and more,” Osorio said. “The release of these documents stands as a uniquely valuable contribution to the cause of human rights, the cause of justice and the cause of our fundamental right-to-know.”
President Macri, has also lauded the special declassification. “This is the largest amount of information that the United States has ever transferred to another country,” Macri announced on Twitter. “These documents will play a fundamental role in advancing justice for still unresolved issues of the past, one of the darkest periods of Argentine history.”
 
HIGHLIGHTS AND VALUE OF THE COLLECTION
Precisely because these records were predominantly generated by the intelligence community—and appear less redacted than previous declassifications—the Argentina documents may well play an evidentiary role in future human rights judicial cases. The documents name names of perpetrators—as identified by the sources of information in the records—as well as provide specific and harrowing details on their countless human rights atrocities and their victims. The records, Osorio points out, “clarify the fate of dozens of disappeared Argentines who vanished without a trace, until now.”
Moreover, the declassification project has produced a historical roadmap that charts what and when U.S. national security agencies and policy makers knew about the human rights abuses in Argentina—and the actions they took, or failed to take, in response to detailed intelligence on internal and international repression by the military regime.
Among the categories of critical information and key revelations contained in the new Argentina collection are the following:
* The Argentina documents include hundreds of detailed FBI reports and cables drafted by the Bureau’s legal attaché in Buenos Aires, Robert S. Scherrer. Scherrer became renowned as the intrepid lead investigator in the September 1976 Washington, D.C., car-bomb assassination of former Chilean Ambassador Orlando Letelier and his colleague, Ronni Karpen Moffitt. Scherrer’s sources pointed the finger of responsibility at General Augusto Pinochet and the Chilean secret police, DINA; Scherrer’s famous “Chilbom” cable, written only eight days after the bombing, suggested the assassination was part of a “phase three” mission of Operation Condor. That cable has now been declassified fully unredacted, identifying Scherrer’s source as an agent at Argentina’s presidential intelligence service, the Secretaria de Inteligencia del Estado, SIDE.

FBI agent Robert Scherrer
 
But Scherrer also reported on his sources’ objections to the Carter administration’s new emphasis on human rights, and the obstacles created by “the human rights problem” to gathering information and maintaining intelligence liaisons. “Several Argentine military contacts have privately informed Legat that they suspect the Central Intelligence Agency provided information [to the State Department] concerning Argentine intelligence service methods used in repressing terrorists, which admittedly were harsh,” Scherrer noted in a June 15, 1977, report. “For this reason, it has become apparent that Argentine Government officials in Buenos Aires are being extremely cautious, in order not to divulge information which might be harmful to Argentina in the human rights area.” Scherrer reported that he had “successfully been able to avoid [a] lack of cooperation by his contacts because of the human rights problem by pointing out that he represents the FBI and his duties do not include gathering intelligence on human rights in Argentina.”
Now declassified, however, his reporting provides the most specific details on case after case of human rights violations while he served as the FBI representative in Buenos Aires.
* At the highest levels of the CIA, the Agency was well aware of Operation Condor’s plans to send assassination teams to European nations to kill leaders of the Junta de Coordinacion Revolucionaria (JCR), an umbrella organization of the militant leftist movements based in Paris, Lisbon, and other European cities. A series of declassified memos written by the CIA’s Latin America Division chief, Raymond A. Warren in July and August 1976—only several weeks before the Letelier-Moffitt carbombing in Washington D.C.—reveals that the CIA was concerned that such operations would have “adverse political ramifications for the Agency should 'Condor' engage in assassinations and other flagrant violations of human rights,” as well as repurcussions for their own liaisons with the Condor intelligence services and the Western European intelligence services. "Every precaution must be taken," Warren wrote to the deputy director of the CIA, "to ensure that the Agency is not wrongfully accused of being a party to this type of activity."
* Those Western intelligence agencies, CIA documents reveal, had their own interest in Operation Condor. In a cable titled “Visit of Representatives of West German, French and British Intelligence Services to Argentina to Discuss Methods for Establishment of an Anti-Subversive Organization Similar to ‘Çondor’,” the CIA reported that their European counter-parts “believed it best if they pooled their intelligence resources in a cooperative organization such as Condor” to better fight the threat of terrorism on the European continent and had visited Buenos Aires in September 1977 to learn more about “the management, administrative and technical aspects related to Condor.”
* Numerous documents provide information on the fates of disappeared Argentines, among them members and leaders of the urban guerilla group, the Montoneros. In a secret August 1975 FBI cable, Robert Scherrer reported on the detention and execution of Montonero leader Marcos Osatinsky. Osatinsky was arrested by the security forces of provincial governor Raul Lacabanne and so severely tortured that a decision was made to execute him, according to a secret FBI report. The authorities then staged his death to make it appear he had been killed during an effort to rescue policemen the Montoneros had supposedly taken hostage. To hide evidence of their abuses, Lacabanne’s security personnel went so far as to hijack the hearse that was transporting Osatinsky’s body from Cordoba to Tucuman.  “The purpose of stealing his body was to prevent the body from being subjected to an autopsy, which would have clearly shown he had been tortured,” Scherrer reported. “It is doubtful that Osatinsky’s body will ever turn up.”
* FBI and CIA reports also shed considerable light on the August 1976 operation by SIDE agents to kidnap, torture, and execute two members of the Cuban Embassy in Buenos Aires, Jesus Cejas Arias and Cresencio Galanena Hernandez. The two were kidnapped by SIDE agents outside the Embassy on August 9, 1976, and transported to the infamous torture center, Automotores Orletti. According to one CIA report, they were “tortured at the detention center for forty-eight hours. They were then killed and their bodies dumped in the Parana River.” The CIA identified one of the SIDE agents by his alias, “Anibal Gordon.”
* A CIA Intelligence Information Cable revealed that SIDE agents also disappeared and murdered Argentina’s own ambassador to Venezuela, Hector Hidalgo Sola, in July 1977. CIA sources described it as a rogue operation “to demand money from his family.” The SIDE team was lead by “Anibal Gordon” but also included the son-in-law of former SIDE Director, Otto Paladino, according to CIA sources.

Gwenda Loken passport application
 
* Declassified FBI and State Department records also shed light on the cases of at least three U.S. citizens who were detained and tortured by Argentine security forces—Patricia Erb, Mercedes Bender and Gwen Loken. The FBI file on Loken indicates she was under surveillance by the FBI for her activities as part of Socialist Youth Alliance and that information on her entry into Argentina may have been shared with the security forces prior to her arrest.
* U.S. documents re-confirmed the sadistic nature of the Argentine military’s human rights violations. One State Department summary of such activities cited the torture of a psychologist, confined to a wheelchair because of polio, who was “interrogated with electric picana” for the sole purpose of obtaining information on one of her patients. The same report revealed that the Argentine military used injections of a powerful anesthetic, Ketalar, on captured victims who were then “disposed of in rivers or the ocean.”
* Since the CIA, FBI, and Defense Intelligence Agency were tasked to focus on countering leftist movements in Latin America, the Argentina collection includes massive amounts of reporting on leftist parties, organizations, and militant movements, among them the Montoneros, ERP, and the Junta de Coordinacion Revolucionaria [JCR]—described in one CIA report as “an umbrella organization for coordinating regional operations” of liberation groups, which shifted from support for guerrilla action to propaganda operations in Europe. After human rights abuses became a significant U.S. foreign policy issue in the mid and late 1970s, cable traffic to Washington included more evidence of torture and disappearances. But there is ample evidence in the records released today of tensions between U.S. agencies about how, and how far, to press the policy of human rights.
Finally exhumed from the sensitive compartmented information facilities (SCIFS) where they have remained classified for almost four decades, the Argentina documents provide a historical record that is highly likely to impact future efforts toward accountability in Argentina, provide long-awaited information for victims and their families, and advance the next generation of analysis and scholarship on the military era.  
To assist that process, the National Security Archive is planning a series of postings on Operation Condor, specific human rights cases, and other revelations contained in the Declassification Project for Argentina.
 
READ THE DOCUMENTS


Document 01
FBI Report, “Gwenda Mae Loken, also known as Gwen Loken,” May 12, 1975.
1975-05-12
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This FBI file sheds light on Gwen Loken, a U.S. citizen who was detained and tortured by Argentine security forces in April 1976. The document indicates she was under surveillance by the FBI for her activities as part of the Socialist Youth Alliance and that information on her entry into Argentina may have been shared with the security forces prior to her arrest.



Document 02
FBI Cable, “Recent Death of Montonero leader Marcos Osatinsky in Cordoba,” Secret, August 26, 1975.
1975-08-26
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

In this cable, legal attaché in Buenos Aires, Robert S. Scherrer, reports on the detention and execution of Montoneros’ leader Marcos Osatinsky. Osatinsky was arrested by the security forces of provincial governor Raul Lacabanne and so severely tortured that a decision was made to execute him, according to a secret FBI report. The authorities then staged his death to make it appear he had been killed during an effort to rescue policemen the Montoneros had supposedly taken hostage. To hide evidence of their abuses, Lacabanne’s security personnel went so far as to hijack the hearse that was transporting Osatinsky’s body from Cordoba to Tucuman. “The purpose of stealing his body was to prevent the body from being subjected to an autopsy, which would have clearly shown he had been tortured,” Scherrer reported. “It is doubtful that Osatinsky’s body will ever turn up.”



Document 03
CIA memorandum, “Operation Condor – Regional Co-operation Among Latin American Intelligence Services Against Terrorism,” Secret, July 24, 1976.
1976-07-24
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

In this memo from Raymond A. Warren, CIA Chief of the Latin America Division, to the Deputy Director of Central Intelligence, Warren raises concerns that the “Condor” countries are organizing squads with the specific purpose “to liquidate key Latin American terrorist leaders.” Warren asks “what action the Agency could effectively take to forestall illegal activity of this sort.”



Document 04
Joint CIA/Department of State memorandum, “Meeting at Department of State to Discuss Operation Condor,” Secret, August 13, 1976.
1976-08-13
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This memo recounts the meeting between, among other participants, Hewson Ryan, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Inter-American Affairs, James Gardner, head of the Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research, and Robert Zimmerman from the Latin America Bureau. “Ryan opened the meeting by stating that the implications of ‘Condor’ in the human rights field had reached the point where some action was required by the U.S. government.”



Document 05
FBI cable, “[Condor: Chilbom]” Secret, September 28, 1976.
1976-09-28
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

The Bureau’s legal attaché in Buenos Aires, Robert S. Scherrer, drafted his famous “Chilbom” cable eight days after the car bomb assassination of former Chilean ambassador, Orlando Letelier, and his colleague, Ronni Karpen Moffitt, in Washington D.C. Scherrer’s sources pointed the finger of responsibility at General Augusto Pinochet and the Chilean secret police, DINA. This cable suggests the assassination was part of a “phase three” mission of Operation Condor. The cable has now been declassified fully unredacted, identifying Scherrer’s source as an agent at Argentina’s presidential intelligence service, the Secretaria de Inteligencia del Estado, SIDE.



Document 06
FBI memorandum, “[Abduction and Assassination of Jesus Cejas Arias and Cresencio Galanena Hernandez],” for the Ambassador from Legal Attaché, Secret/Eyes Only, October 19, 1976.
1976-10-19
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

Legal attaché Scherrer reports that the two Cuban diplomatic staff bodies “were cemented into one large storage drum and thrown into the Rio Lujan.” Scherrer’s source estimates that “Because Cejas and Galanena had been immersed in water for such considerable period of time… it is doubtful that they will be identified.” The remains were identified in 2012 through DNA by the Argentine Team of Forensic Anthropology.



Document 07
CIA cable, “Argentina: Criticism [over] soft policy toward subversion,” Secret, December 3, 1976.
1976-12-03
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

The CIA reports that powerful military commanders, like the head of the Army First Corps’ General Suarez Mason, the commander at the infamous “Campo de Mayo” General Santiago Omar Riveros, along with the head of the Buenos Aires Provincial Police (BAPP), all agreed “that it is time to stop being so easy on the terrorists in the country and start an all out war against them. The head of the BAPP states that starting immediately the BAPP would be taking a harder stance and “until further notice he wanted no prisoners for interrogation, only cadavers.” The report states that while some recent actions in La Plata region against subversives have been legitimate, “others have been fabrications… designed to explain away the killing of prisoners.”



Document 08
CIA Report, Agreement of Condor Countries in May 1976 to Form A Unit to Operate Against Leftists in France, Secret, February 16, 1977.
1977-02-16
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This CIA intelligence report recounts how in late May, 1976, the secret police chieftains of the Southern Cone military regimes gathered at a clandestine “Condor” summit in Santiago, Chile, to create a “new unit, which was given the code name ‘Teseo,’”—a reference to Theseus, the mythical Greek King of the Athenians and heroic slayer of the Minotaur among other enemies. The mission of “Teseo” was to “conduct physical attacks against subversive targets” abroad, particularly militant Latin American leftists in Europe.



Document 09
FBI report, “[U.S. Criticism of Argentina for Alleged Human Rights Violations],” Secret, June 15, 1977.
1977-06-15
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

In this report to the FBI Director, Scherrer reports on his sources’ objections to the Carter administration’s new emphasis on human rights, and the obstacles created by “the human rights problem” to gathering information and maintaining intelligence liaisons. “Several Argentine military contacts have privately informed Legat that they suspect the Central Intelligence Agency provided information [to the State Department] concerning Argentine intelligence service methods used in repressing terrorists, which admittedly were harsh,” Scherrer noted in the report. “For this reason, it has become apparent that Argentine Government officials in Buenos Aires are being extremely cautious, in order not to divulge information which might be harmful to Argentina in the human rights area.” Scherrer reported that he had “successfully been able to avoid lack of cooperation by his contacts because of the human rights problem by pointing out that he represents the FBI and his duties do not include gathering intelligence on human rights in Argentina.”



Document 10
CIA Intelligence Information Report, Text of the Agreement by Condor Countries Regulating Their Subversive Targets, August 16, 1977.
1977-08-16
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

The CIA obtained the “text of the agreement by Condor countries regulating their operations against subversive targets”—a comprehensive planning paper on financing, staffing, logistics, training and selection of targets that reveals both the banal and dramatic details of organizing and implementing Condor’s “Teseo” death squad operations. The “Teseo” operations base would be located “at Condor 1 (Argentina).”  Each member country was expected to donate $10,000 to offset operational costs; and dues of $200 would be paid “prior to the 30th of each month” for maintenance expenses of the operations center. Expenses for agents on assassination missions abroad were estimated at $3,500 per person for ten days, “with an additional $1000 first time out for clothing allowance.”



Document 11
CIA memorandum, “Potential Political and Security Ramifications of Operation Condor,” Secret, August 17, 1976.
1977-08-17
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This declassified CIA memo written by the CIA’s Western Hemisphere Division chief, William Broe, reveals that the CIA was concerned that such operations would have “repercussions” for their own liaisons with the Condor intelligence services as well as the Western European intelligence services.



Document 12
CIA Intelligence Information Cable, “Kidnapping and Assassination of Argentine Ambassador to Venezuela by a Group Associated with Argentine State Intelligence Secretariat (SIDE) Without Side Knowledge or Authorization,” Secret/Exclusive for, September 8, 1977.
1977-09-08
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This CIA intelligence cable reveals that SIDE agents also disappeared and murdered Argentina’s own ambassador to Venezuela, Hector Hidalgo Sola, in July 1977. CIA sources described it as a rogue operation “to demand money from his family.” The SIDE team was led by “Anibal Gordon” but also included the son-in-law of former SIDE Director, Otto Paladino, according to CIA sources.



Document 13
CIA Intelligence Information Cable, “Visit of Representatives of West German, French and British Intelligence Services to Argentina to Discuss Methods for Establishment of an Anti-Subversive Organization Similar to Condor,” Secret, April 7, 1978.
1978-04-07
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

The CIA reports here that their European counter-parts “believed it best if they pooled their intelligence resources in a cooperative organization such as Condor” to better fight the threat of terrorism on the European continent and had visited Buenos Aires in September 1977 to learn more about “the management, administrative and technical aspects related to Condor.”



Document 14
State Department Cable, “Human Rights Roundup,” Confidential, July 21, 1978.
1978-07-21
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This State Department summary of human rights violations in Argentina cites the torture of a psychologist, confined to a wheelchair because of polio, who was “interrogated with electric picana [prod]” for the sole purpose of obtaining information on one of her patients. The same report revealed that the Argentine military used injections of a powerful anesthetic, Ketalar, on captured victims who were then “disposed of in rivers or the ocean.”



Document 15
CIA Report, “[Report on the Junta Coordinacion Revolucionaria (JCR)]” Secret, July 25, 1978
1978-07-25
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This report describes the Junta de Coordinacion Revolucionaria [JCR] as “an umbrella organization for coordinating regional operations” of liberation groups, which shifted from support for guerrilla action to propaganda operations in Europe.



Document 16
CIA cable, “Argentina/Brazil: Death of Montonero Leader Norberto Habegger,” Secret/Exclusive for, April 12, 1979.
1979-04-12
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

Norberto Habbeger disappeared in Brazil in 1978 never to be heard of again. This CIA cable reveals that he “was executed in late November or early December 1978 by order of the Chief of the counterintelligence section of the Argentine Army Intelligence Service (SIE).”



Document 17
CIA cable, “Argentina: Interrogation and Killing of at least Nine Subversives,” Secret/Exclusive for, May 21, 1983.
1983-05-21
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This chilling document reports that - only months before the transition to the democratic presidency of Raul Alfonsin at the end of 1983 - the security apparatus continued its killing program. Using euphemisms for torture, the report states, “In early April… six or seven were detained and extensively debriefed. They were then killed.” It says that information obtained in that operation “led to the capture of Raul Yaeger… [after he] was debriefed, he was killed in a staged firefight in Cordoba on April 30.”



Document 18
CIA Report, “Background on the August 1976 Disappearance of Two Cuban Embassy Security Men,” Secret, July 27, 1985.
1985-07-27
Source: Argentina Declassification Project, April 2019

This CIA report says Jesus Cejas Arias and Cresencio Galanena Hernandez – two members of the Cuban Embassy kidnapped, tortured, and executed by SIDE agents – were “tortured at the detention center for forty-eight hours. They were then killed and their bodies dumped in the Parana River.” The CIA identified one of the SIDE agents by his alias, “Anibal Gordon.”


Categories:
Human Rights and Genocide
Torture
Regions:
South America
Events:
Argentine Dirty War, 1976-1983
Operation Condor, 1968-1989
Project:
Southern Cone
ARGENTINA DECLASSIFICATION PROJECT
Documents Release [Final Tranche]:
CIA, FBI and DOD records. April 12, 2019
Documents Release [Tranche III]:
Department of State re-Review, April 27, 2017
FRUS documents, April 27, 2017
Documents Release [Tranche II]:
Office of the Director of National Intelligence, December 12, 2016
Documents Release [Tranche I]:
Office of the Director of National Intelligence, August 8, 2016
 
RELATED LINKS
"We know the FBI’s records on the dictatorship are rich in information"
April 6, 2019
Declassification Diplomacy: Trump Administration to Turn Over Trove of Declassified Records to Argentina on Human Rights Violations Committed During Military Dictatorship
March 24, 2019
"This is the largest amount of information that the United States has ever transferred to another country”
President Mauricio Macri’s Twitter account
March 24, 2019
“On April 12, I will receive, in the National Archives building of
Washington DC, the largest delivery of declassified documents related
to the last civic-military dictatorship.”
Minister of Justice and Human Rights Germán Garavano ’s Twitter account
March 24, 2019
USA will deliver declassified documents of the last military dictatorship
Argentine Foreign Ministry press release
March 24, 2019
 

President Trump's letter to President Macri commemorates the final delivery of records for the Argentina declassification project.
 

Left: a previously declassified, redacted version of an FBI report on the abduction and murder of two Cuban Embassy officers in Buenos Aires; right: The unredacted version released as part of the Argentina Declassification Project. (click on image to enlarge)
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