MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Knowing the truth about the Kennedy Assassination is understanding America today.

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MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby Dealey Joe » Thu Dec 01, 2011 11:37 pm

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Born Michael King, Jr.
January 15, 1929
Atlanta, Georgia, United States
Died April 4, 1968 (aged 39)
Memphis, Tennessee, United States
Monuments Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Alma mater Morehouse College, Crozer Theological Seminary, Boston University
Organization Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)
Influenced by Jesus, Abraham Lincoln, Mahatma Gandhi, Benjamin Mays, Hosea Williams, Bayard Rustin, Henry David Thoreau, Howard Thurman, Leo Tolstoy
Political movement African-American Civil Rights Movement, Peace movement
Religion Progressive National Baptist Convention
Spouse Coretta Scott King (m. 1953–68)
Children Yolanda Denise-King (deceased)
Martin Luther King III
Dexter Scott King
Bernice Albertine King
Parents Martin Luther King, Sr.
Alberta Williams King
Awards Nobel Peace Prize (1964), Presidential Medal of Freedom (1977, posthumous), Congressional Gold Medal (2004, posthumous)
Signature
Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American clergyman, activist, and prominent leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement.[1] He is best known for being an iconic figure in the advancement of civil rights in the United States and around the world, using nonviolent methods following the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi.[2] King has become a national icon in the history of modern American liberalism.[3]
A Baptist minister, King became a civil rights activist early in his career.[4] He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. King's efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech. There, he expanded American values to include the vision of a color blind society, and established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history.
In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other nonviolent means. By the time of his death in 1968, he had refocused his efforts on ending poverty and stopping the Vietnam War.
King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004; Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. federal holiday in 1986.


Thurman
Civil rights leader, theologian, and educator Howard Thurman was an early influence on King. A classmate of King's father at Morehouse College,[19] Thurman mentored the young King and his friends.[20] Thurman's missionary work had taken him abroad where he had met and conferred with Mahatma Gandhi.[21] When he was a student at Boston University, King often visited Thurman, who was the dean of Marsh Chapel.[22] Walter Fluker, who has studied Thurman's writings, has stated, "I don't believe you'd get a Martin Luther King, Jr. without a Howard Thurman".[23]
Gandhi and Rustin
With assistance from the Quaker group the American Friends Service Committee, and inspired by Gandhi's success with non-violent activism, King visited Gandhi's birthplace in India in 1959.[6]:3 The trip to India affected King in a profound way, deepening his understanding of non-violent resistance and his commitment to America's struggle for civil rights. In a radio address made during his final evening in India, King reflected, "Since being in India, I am more convinced than ever before that the method of nonviolent resistance is the most potent weapon available to oppressed people in their struggle for justice and human dignity. In a real sense, Mahatma Gandhi embodied in his life certain universal principles that are inherent in the moral structure of the universe, and these principles are as inescapable as the law of gravitation."[6]:135–6 African American civil rights activist Bayard Rustin had studied Gandhi's teachings.[24] Rustin counseled King to dedicate himself to the principles of non-violence,[25] served as King's main advisor and mentor throughout his early activism,[26] and was the main organizer of the 1963 March on Washington.[27] Rustin's open homosexuality, support of democratic socialism, and his former ties to the Communist Party USA caused many white and African-American leaders to demand King distance himself from Rustin.[28]
Public stance on political parties
As the leader of the SCLC, King maintained a policy of not publicly endorsing a U.S. political party or candidate: "I feel someone must remain in the position of non-alignment, so that he can look objectively at both parties and be the conscience of both—not the servant or master of either."[29]
In a 1958 interview, he expressed his view that neither party was perfect, saying, "I don't think the Republican party is a party full of the almighty God nor is the Democratic party. They both have weaknesses ... And I'm not inextricably bound to either party."[30]
King critiqued both parties' performance on promoting racial equality:
Actually, the Negro has been betrayed by both the Republican and the Democratic party. The Democrats have betrayed him by capitulating to the whims and caprices of the Southern Dixiecrats. The Republicans have betrayed him by capitulating to the blatant hypocrisy of reactionary right wing northern Republicans. And this coalition of southern Dixiecrats and right wing reactionary northern Republicans defeats every bill and every move towards liberal legislation in the area of civil rights.[31]
Personal political advocacy
Although King never publicly supported a political party or candidate for president, in a letter to a civil rights supporter in October 1956 he said that he was undecided as to whether he would vote for the Adlai Stevenson or Dwight Eisenhower, but that "In the past I always voted the Democratic ticket."[32]
In his autobiography, King says that in 1960 he privately voted for Democratic candidate John F. Kennedy: "I felt that Kennedy would make the best president. I never came out with an endorsement. My father did, but I never made one." King adds that he likely would have made an exception to his non-endorsement policy in 1964, saying "Had President Kennedy lived, I would probably have endorsed him in 1964."

Assassination and its aftermath

Main article: Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.


The Lorraine Motel, where King was assassinated, is now the site of the National Civil Rights Museum.
"I've Been to the Mountaintop"

Final 30 seconds of "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech by Martin Luther King, Jr.
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
On March 29, 1968, King went to Memphis, Tennessee, in support of the black sanitary public works employees, represented by AFSCME Local 1733, who had been on strike since March 12 for higher wages and better treatment. In one incident, black street repairmen received pay for two hours when they were sent home because of bad weather, but white employees were paid for the full day.[114][115][116]
On April 3, King addressed a rally and delivered his "I've Been to the Mountaintop" address at Mason Temple, the world headquarters of the Church of God in Christ. King's flight to Memphis had been delayed by a bomb threat against his plane.[117] In the close of the last speech of his career, in reference to the bomb threat, King said the following:
And then I got to Memphis. And some began to say the threats, or talk about the threats that were out. What would happen to me from some of our sick white brothers? Well, I don't know what will happen now. We've got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn't matter with me now. Because I've been to the mountaintop. And I don't mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do God's will. And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I've looked over. And I've seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land. And I'm happy, tonight. I'm not worried about anything. I'm not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.[118]
King was booked in room 306 at the Lorraine Motel, owned by Walter Bailey, in Memphis. The Reverend Ralph Abernathy, King's close friend and colleague who was present at the assassination, testified under oath to the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations that King and his entourage stayed at room 306 at the Lorraine Motel so often it was known as the "King-Abernathy suite."[119]
According to Jesse Jackson, who was present, King's last words on the balcony prior to his assassination were spoken to musician Ben Branch, who was scheduled to perform that night at an event King was attending: "Ben, make sure you play 'Take My Hand, Precious Lord' in the meeting tonight. Play it real pretty."[120]
Then, at 6:01 p.m., April 4, 1968, a shot rang out as King stood on the motel's second floor balcony. The bullet entered through his right cheek, smashing his jaw, then traveled down his spinal cord before lodging in his shoulder.[121][122] Abernathy heard the shot from inside the motel room and ran to the balcony to find King on the floor.[123] The events following the shooting have been disputed, as some people have accused Jackson of exaggerating his response.[124]
After emergency chest surgery, King was pronounced dead at St. Joseph's Hospital at 7:05 p.m.[125] According to biographer Taylor Branch, King's autopsy revealed that though only thirty-nine years old, he had the heart of a sixty-year-old man, perhaps a result of the stress of thirteen years in the civil rights movement.[126][clarification needed]
The assassination led to a nationwide wave of race riots in Washington D.C., Chicago, Baltimore, Louisville, Kentucky, Kansas City, and dozens of other cities.[127] Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy was on his way to Indianapolis for a campaign rally when he was informed of King's death. He gave a short speech to the gathering of supporters informing them of the tragedy and urging them to continue King's ideal of non-violence.[128] James Farmer, Jr. and other civil rights leaders also called for non-violent action,[129] while the more militant Stokely Carmichael called for a more forceful response.[129]
President Lyndon B. Johnson declared April 7 a national day of mourning for the civil rights leader.[130] Vice-President Hubert Humphrey attended King's funeral on behalf of the President, as there were fears that Johnson's presence might incite protests and perhaps violence.[131]
At his widow's request, King's last sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church was played at the funeral,[132] a recording of his "Drum Major" sermon, given on February 4, 1968. In that sermon, King made a request that at his funeral no mention of his awards and honors be made, but that it be said that he tried to "feed the hungry", "clothe the naked", "be right on the [Vietnam] war question", and "love and serve humanity".[133] His good friend Mahalia Jackson sang his favorite hymn, "Take My Hand, Precious Lord", at the funeral.[134]
The city of Memphis quickly settled the strike on terms favorable to the sanitation workers.[135][136]
Two months after King's death, escaped convict James Earl Ray was captured at London Heathrow Airport while trying to leave the United Kingdom on a false Canadian passport in the name of Ramon George Sneyd on his way to white-ruled Rhodesia.[137] Ray was quickly extradited to Tennessee and charged with King's murder. He confessed to the assassination on March 10, 1969, though he recanted this confession three days later.[138] On the advice of his attorney Percy Foreman, Ray pleaded guilty to avoid a trial conviction and thus the possibility of receiving the death penalty. Ray was sentenced to a 99-year prison term.[138][139] Ray fired Foreman as his attorney, from then on derisively calling him "Percy Fourflusher".[140] He claimed a man he met in Montreal, Quebec, with the alias "Raoul" was involved and that the assassination was the result of a conspiracy.[141][142] He spent the remainder of his life attempting, unsuccessfully, to withdraw his guilty plea and secure the trial he never had.[139] On June 10, 1977, shortly after Ray had testified to the House Select Committee on Assassinations that he did not shoot King, he and six other convicts escaped from Brushy Mountain State Penitentiary in Petros, Tennessee. They were recaptured on June 13 and returned to prison.[143]
Allegations of conspiracy
Ray's lawyers maintained he was a scapegoat similar to the way that John F. Kennedy assassin Lee Harvey Oswald is seen by conspiracy theorists.[144] One of the claims used to support this assertion is that Ray's confession was given under pressure, and he had been threatened with the death penalty.[139][145] Ray was a thief and burglar, but he had no record of committing violent crimes with a weapon.[142]
Those suspecting a conspiracy in the assassination point to the two successive ballistics tests which while proving that a rifle similar to Ray's Remington Gamemaster had been the murder weapon, did not prove that his specific rifle had been the one used.[139][146] Moreover, witnesses surrounding King at the moment of his death say the shot came from another location, from behind thick shrubbery near the rooming house—which had been inexplicably cut away in the days following the assassination—and not from the rooming house window.[147]


Martin Luther King & Coretta Scott King's tomb, located on the grounds of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta, Georgia
.
In 1997, King's son Dexter Scott King met with Ray, and publicly supported Ray's efforts to obtain a new trial.[148] Two years later, Coretta Scott King, King's widow, along with the rest of King's family, won a wrongful death claim against Loyd Jowers and "other unknown co-conspirators". Jowers claimed to have received $100,000 to arrange King's assassination. The jury of six whites and six blacks found Jowers guilty and that government agencies were party to the assassination.[149] William F. Pepper represented the King family in the trial.[150] King biographer David Garrow disagrees with William F. Pepper's claims that the government killed King.[151] He is supported by author Gerald Posner who has researched and written about the assassination.[152]
In 2000, the United States Department of Justice completed the investigation about Jowers' claims but did not find evidence to support allegations about conspiracy. The investigation report recommended no further investigation unless some new reliable facts are presented.[153] In 2002, The New York Times reported a church minister, Rev. Ronald Denton Wilson, claimed his father, Henry Clay Wilson—not James Earl Ray—assassinated Martin Luther King, Jr. He stated, "It wasn't a racist thing; he thought Martin Luther King was connected with communism, and he wanted to get him out of the way." Wilson provided no evidence to back up his claims.[154]
King's friend and colleague, James Bevel, disputed the argument that Ray acted alone, stating, "There is no way a ten-cent white boy could develop a plan to kill a million-dollar black man."[155] In 2004, Jesse Jackson, who was with King at the time of his death, noted:
The fact is there were saboteurs to disrupt the march. And within our own organization, we found a very key person who was on the government payroll. So infiltration within, saboteurs from without and the press attacks. ... I will never believe that James Earl Ray had the motive, the money and the mobility to have done it himself. Our government was very involved in setting the stage for and I think the escape route for James Earl Ray.
If you ask the wrong questions the answer does not matter!
then if you control the questions being asked the answer still does not matter!
To continue doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result is "Insane"
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby Dealey Joe » Thu Dec 01, 2011 11:41 pm

JFK and MLK
by Dealey Joe » Fri Jun 24, 2011 6:37 am

I trust no one will be offended by what I saw and felt in the late 1950's and early 1960's. Got my first car in 1956, Graduated from high school in 1959 and got married the same year.
Voted for the first time in 1960. Had my first drink in a bar in 1962.

This was a great time in my life, I came of age then. Changed from a kid to a young adult in Indiana, not south and not north.

We did not understand the commotion the black folks were making down south. In our town all the blacks lived in a section near the downtown area. When the city ran a bus line in the 50's black folks set wherever they wanted and although looked and acted differently, were part of the community. I do think the overall thinking was that they should remain where they were but I saw no physical evidence of this and actually think this was because they actually wanted to remain together.

Somewhere along the line I learned to use the word nigger, I don't remember why, no one in town would ever disrespect a black person and use that word in their presents, actually the only time I ever heard the word use in their vicinity was when they called themselves that. If a black person was aggravated at another one they would call him a ni**er.

I always had a respect for the black folks who lived on East 14th Street. The head of the black community was "Speedy". Speedy ran a car wash, I don't mean under a tree in his back yard, he had a two story building that had "Speedy's Car Wash" painted on the front of it.
Speedy would pick up your car at your home, take it and clean it up and return it. Speedy always done the pick up and delivery. Speedy hired every black kid who wanted to work, It was considered an honor to work for Speedy. I had a lot of respect for Speedy.
In a way Speedy was a role model for me causing me to want to have a business of me own.
Of course his customers were affluent folks who could afford his services and he had plenty of them.

Speedy was well known by the bankers in town, probably had more money than most and always drove a new car, Chevy at first then Oldsmobile.

Tin Town was on the outskirts of town and was inhabited with poor white folks, It was spoken of in much harsher tones than E. 14th St. ever thought about.

We did not understand the things going on to our south, could not understand why these people were unhappy. We was of the opinion that someone was behind all the turmoil, stirring up things, trying to make happy people feel unhappy. I still feel that way today. MLK was a trouble maker, and a communist agitator from the North.

We did not understand slavery, we did not see slavery but in ways we did feel it because in one way or another we knew our class and where we fit in.
We were working people, then there were the store keepers and business people lawyers and politicians whom everyone looked up to.

When I was in high school I saw how class distinction worked, the doctors, lawyers and big business peoples kids were always chosen for the Basketball and football teams regardless of skill, so we all felt segregation of some sort. It was never a black/white thing.

I have only noticed recently in reviewing material from the early 60's that MLK and JFK were saying the very same things. One causing turmoil and one trying to control it. But it seems that they were both saying the same things, working together?
If you ask the wrong questions the answer does not matter!
then if you control the questions being asked the answer still does not matter!
To continue doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result is "Insane"
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby Dealey Joe » Thu Dec 01, 2011 11:44 pm

Re: JFK and MLK
by kenmurray » Fri Jul 01, 2011 9:02 am

Anna Ray on The Phil Donahue show in 1993:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AKw6g8gc20

Judge Joe Brown Slams Memphis Over The King Case:

http://ctka.net/pr798-judge.html
If you ask the wrong questions the answer does not matter!
then if you control the questions being asked the answer still does not matter!
To continue doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result is "Insane"
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby kenmurray » Tue Dec 06, 2011 1:05 pm

Hoover tries to get MLK to commit suicide:

http://dimewars.com/Video/J--Edgar-Hoov ... 4f09a05dd6
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby kenmurray » Tue Dec 06, 2011 1:11 pm

The Fatal Shot Came From A Different Direction:

http://whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICL ... looked.php
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby kenmurray » Tue Dec 06, 2011 1:14 pm

MLK Assassination Conspiracy Trial:

http://www.williampepper.com/video.html
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby kenmurray » Fri Dec 12, 2014 8:11 pm

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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby Slav » Sun Dec 14, 2014 5:28 am

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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby Ed Teach » Sun Sep 06, 2015 4:55 pm

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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby kenmurray » Tue Sep 08, 2015 1:47 pm

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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby kenmurray » Sat Mar 05, 2016 4:52 pm

Notice here when Cronkite broke the story on the MLK Assassination on the CBS Evening News he described the shooter as "A well dressed young white man seen running from the scene." Also a radio equipped car containing 2 white men! Since when was James Earl Ray "A well dressed young white man"? :shock:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmOBbxgxKvo
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby Bob » Sat Mar 05, 2016 5:48 pm

kenmurray wrote:Notice here when Cronkite broke the story on the MLK Assassination on the CBS Evening News he described the shooter as "A well dressed young white man seen running from the scene." Also a radio equipped car containing 2 white men! Since when was James Earl Ray "A well dressed young white man"? :shock:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmOBbxgxKvo


Yes, very interesting. When JFK was assassinated, Walter first reported that the rifle found in the TSBD was a Mauser, not a Mannlicher Carcano. :shock: :roll: :oops:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AqqNKsWCGY
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby kenmurray » Sat Mar 05, 2016 6:15 pm

Bob wrote:
kenmurray wrote:Notice here when Cronkite broke the story on the MLK Assassination on the CBS Evening News he described the shooter as "A well dressed young white man seen running from the scene." Also a radio equipped car containing 2 white men! Since when was James Earl Ray "A well dressed young white man"? :shock:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmOBbxgxKvo


Yes, very interesting. When JFK was assassinated, Walter first reported that the rifle found in the TSBD was a Mauser, not a Mannlicher Carcano. :shock: :roll: :oops:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AqqNKsWCGY



Lets not forget also a 30-30 Rifle. :shock:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZOp0YK6jQM
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby Bob » Sat Mar 05, 2016 6:22 pm

kenmurray wrote:
Bob wrote:
kenmurray wrote:Notice here when Cronkite broke the story on the MLK Assassination on the CBS Evening News he described the shooter as "A well dressed young white man seen running from the scene." Also a radio equipped car containing 2 white men! Since when was James Earl Ray "A well dressed young white man"? :shock:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmOBbxgxKvo


Yes, very interesting. When JFK was assassinated, Walter first reported that the rifle found in the TSBD was a Mauser, not a Mannlicher Carcano. :shock: :roll: :oops:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AqqNKsWCGY



Lets not forget also a 30-30 Rifle. :shock:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZOp0YK6jQM


The ironic thing about all this is that Walter was probably describing the rifles (Mauser and 30-30) used by a couple of the actual shooters (LHO not being one of them) that day in Dealey Plaza. :shock:
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Re: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Postby kenmurray » Mon Mar 07, 2016 3:21 pm

MLK: The Assassination tapes shows footage not seen before:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqIidpUmFr8
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